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European Prostitution Laws

The United States is not somewhere we are ever going to work. And Smooci notwithstanding, I do not see us going into the Far East, South America, Middle East or Eastern Europe. So, I will just discuss Europe. 

There are a number of subcategories within the legal frameworks. So though we are focusing on Barcelona escorts, it is worth looking a little wider.

  • Countries where prostitution and managing brothels and escorts is legal: Greece, Austria (since 2014, Belgium (informally), Germany (since 2002), Netherlands, Switzerland,  
  • Countries where prostitution is legal but managing a brothel or escorts is illegal: United Kingdom, Denmark (since 1999), Italy, Portugal, Luxemburg, Monaco,  
  • Countries where prostitution is legal but customers are prosecuted: Ireland (since 2017), France (disastrously since 2016),  
  • Countries where all sex work is illegal: Gibraltar(!) 

Spain, as you would expect, is a complicated anomaly. Prostitution itself is legal in Spain, but pimping is not. Owning an establishment where prostitution takes place is legal if the owner neither derives financial gain from prostitution nor hires any person for the purposes of selling sex, because prostitution is not considered a job, and has no legal recognition (though income from prostitution is, of course, taxable) Most regions do not regulate prostitution, but the government of Catalonia offers licenses for persons “to gather people to practice prostitution”.

Strictly speaking, we should make it clear that we charge a commission for advertising and answering the telephone. Not for prostitution. 

On the face of the above, the law is changing in opposite directions in Europe over roughly the same timescale.  

Germany and Austria effectively legalised the sex industry (not the same as or good as decriminalisation) in 2002 and 2014 respectively.  Denmark decriminalised prostitution (but not brothel keeping or managing escorts) in 1999. 

France and Ireland introduced laws criminalising the buyers of sex in 2016 and 2017, following Sweden and Norway, who did the same 1999 and 2008. In the cases of France and Ireland, it immediately led to problems (lower prices, increased violence against sex workers, lower condom use) and sex workers have suffered. Sex workers continue to protest against the laws and academics repeat their findings, but we have seen that politicians will never let facts get in the way of their narrative. Especially not in ostensibly Roman Catholic countries.  

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Women Not Protecting Women

It must be said that the more extensive ladies’ development still avoids sex labourers and even effectively battles against them. Continuously in the anecdotal structure of battling dealing. Which, as we probably am aware, truly isn’t the issue that individuals describe it. Horrendous when it occurs, yet just not so normal.

Society should discover methods for changing their demeanour and lawful ways to deal with the more extensive sex industry. In any case, rationale is probably not going to have wherever in the discussion. Government officials don’t follow up on reality. Even in Spain, where there are no laws at all related to the work of Madrid escorts. They follow up on what they see to be the popular’s assessment; which is exhibited by who yells most intense and undermines their re-appointment or advancement possibilities. A solitary model will show the point.

An escape clause made sex work, rehearsed away from public scrutiny, lawful in the State of Rhode Island somewhere in the range of 2003 and 2009.Baylor University financial analyst Scott Cunningham and his associates found that during those years the sex exchange developed. Yet, Cunningham focuses to some other significant discoveries: During that time-span the quantity of assaults answered to police in the state declined by over a third. What’s more, gonorrhoea among all ladies declined by 39 percent. Obviously, changes in prostitution laws probably won’t be the main source, yet Cunningham says, “the exchange off is in the event that you make it more secure somewhat, you develop the business.”

Rhode Island made sex work unlawful again in 2009, to some degree under strain from some enemy of dealing advocates. That is the thing; the discussion about sex work consistently gets connected to dealing, and consistently without any realities or actualities made up on the spot from an example of one. Certainties won’t sell society or legislators. What’s more, legislators won’t push forward of society.

Be that as it may, society is moving quickly toward the acknowledgement of prostitution and sex work. This can be seen effectively in the volume of enormous spending plan and prominent TV projects and movies centring on or highlighting sex work; The Girlfriend Experience (film and TV), The Client List, The Deuce, Hung, Harlots, Secret Diary Of A London Call Girl, Game Of Thrones, Tipping The Velvet, Cathouse, West World, After Porn Ends, Hot Girls Wanted and Hustlers.

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Why Does The Women’s Movement Hate Some Women?

It has to be said that the wider women’s movement still excludes sex workers and even actively campaigns against them. Always in the fictional framework of fighting trafficking. Which, as we know, really is not the issue that people make it out to be. Horrific when it happens, but just not that common.

Society will have to find ways of changing their attitudes and legal approaches to the broader sex industry. But logic is unlikely to have any place in the conversation. Politicians do not act on fact. Except in Switzerland, where Geneva escorts work in a safe legal environment. They act on what they perceive to be the public’s opinion; which is demonstrated by who shouts loudest and threatens their re-election or promotion chances. A single example will demonstrate the point.

A loophole made sex work, practiced behind closed doors, legal in the State of Rhode Island between 2003 and 2009.Baylor University economist Scott Cunningham and his colleagues found that during those years the sex trade grew. But Cunningham points to some other important findings: During that time period the number of rapes reported to police in the state declined by over a third. And gonorrhea among all women declined by 39 percent. Of course, changes in prostitution laws might not be the only cause, but Cunningham says, “the trade-off is if you make it safer to some degree, you grow the industry.”

Rhode Island made sex work illegal again in 2009, in part under pressure from some anti-trafficking advocates. That’s the thing; the debate about sex work always gets linked to trafficking, and always with no facts or facts made up on the spot from a sample of one. Facts will not sell society or politicians. And politicians will not move ahead of society. 

But society is moving rapidly toward the acceptance of prostitution and sex work. This can be seen easily in the volume of big budget and high profile television programmes and films centring on or featuring sex work; The Girlfriend Experience (film and TV), The Client List, The Deuce, Hung, Harlots, Secret Diary Of A London Call Girl, Game Of Thrones, Tipping The Velvet, Cathouse, West World, After Porn Ends, Hot Girls Wanted and Hustlers. 

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Does sex sell?

The simplest and shortest answer to that question is yes, sex sells. The slightly longer answer is that sex sells some things, some of the time, for some people, to some people, in some situations. Which obviously is not quite as sexy an answer a s a simple yes! But it is more truthful and accurate. Human beings are very sex focused. It is not just me, and it is not just you. Humans crave sex. Of whatever kind and with whomever floats their particular boat. I am not suggesting that people wander around constantly fantasising about what kind of sex we can have next and with whom, or that people are looking for and thinking about all the time. Actually, yes that is exactly what I am suggesting, but it is based on research. And on years working in the sex industry actually selling sex.

Incidentally, selling sex is nothing like as easy as you would think. Everyone has this idea that if you are a sex worker or run a brothel or escort agency such as Elegant Escorts Geneva then all you have to do is just put some adverts out, and you will immediately become a millionaire. And then you just have the problem of managing all your newly earned wealth – and presumably laundering your money and avoiding taxes. Nope, not close. It is nothing like that at all!

I came across some research recently – not literally, because that would be embarassing and messy and indeed expensive because I was reading the research on my laptop! Anyway the research was published in The Journal Of Sex Research – which you would think should be my favourite reading but it is actually norally irritating.

The research reported that the average male thinks about sex around nineteen times a day. I am not sure what the research methodology was, but that sounds like a hell of a lot of under reporting to me – nineteen times a day? I think more like nineteen times an hour! Or maybe they actually meant more than just a random horny thought at a photo or whatever. Perhaps they meant explicitly panning a sexual encounter or fantasising about a specific sexual act with a specific person (or thing!).